Have You Screened Your Medical Billing Employees Lately? HHS-OIG is Aggressively Targeting Health Care Providers That Employ Individuals Who Have Been Excluded from Participation in Federal Health Benefits Programs

Robert W. Liles, Esq., Liles Parker December 27th, 2010

Leave a Comment Latest by COMMENTOR NAME

 Earlier this month, HHS-OIG announced that it had assessed significant civil monetary penalties against a health care provider that employed seven individuals who the provider “knew or should have known” had been excluded from  participation in Federal health care programs. These individuals were alleged to have  furnished items and services for which the provider was paid by Federal health care programs.

 The provider paid $376,432 to resolve these allegations.  As Lewis Morris, Chief Counsel to the Office of Inspector General stated:

“Providers self-disclosing such violations will ultimately pay lower settlement amounts. . . But in cases initiated by the government — such as this one — providers will, as a matter of course, be required to pay more to resolve the matter.’ 

As Mr. Morris further noted: 

“This case illustrates yet again that OIG will pursue CMPs when providers have employed an excluded person for the furnishing of items or services paid for by Federal health care programs,”

 Notably, this matter was referred to HHS-OIG for investigation by the State Medicaid Fraud Control Unit (MFCU).

 Lessons to be Learned:

 This case illustrates a number of important lessons for all health care providers who participate in Federal Health Benefits Program, regardless of size.  These lessons include:

Screening employees is easy and quick: It takes very little effort for a provider to screen current and prospective employees against HHS-OIG list of excluded parties and GSA’ s list of parties who have been debarred from participation in Federal contracts.  Notably, the failure to screen employees can be quite costly.

 No mention of actual fraud or overpayment was mentioned in this case.  Nevertheless, the employment of excluded individuals was found to be quite serious by HHS-OIG:   HHS-OIG won’t hesitate to pursue civil monetary penalties against a provider who employs excluded individuals, despite the fact that no mention is made of any wrongful billings.  Regular screenings of your employees should be made to ensure that none of your employees have been excluded from participation.

The government is serious about self-disclosing problems:   HHS-OIG’s Chief Counsel went out of his way to point out that provider’s who self-disclose will ultimately pay a lower amount of damages to the government.  While we recognize the government’s preference in this regard, should you identify a problem, you should contact legal counsel before making a self-disclosure.  HHS-OIG’s voluntary disclosure protocol has a number of requirements that should be fully assessed prior to deciding to make a disclosure under the program.  To be clear, if you owe money to the government, you must pay it back.  The issue to be resolved is how to go about returning any monies to which you are not entitled. Depending on the circumstances, a provider may be better off working with their Medicare Administrative Contractor to resolve a problem.   In other cases, HHS-OIG’s protocol may be the best option.  Every situation is different and should be carefully assessed before action is taken.

Federal and State law enforcement teams are coordinating their actions and findings:   Notably, these violations were first identified by a State MFCU who then contacted HHS-OIG.  Similarly, we are seeing State Medical Boards advising ZPICs of actions they are taking against licensed health care providers.  In several cases, the State Medical Board found that the provider was either not providing adequate supervision over subordinate Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants.  The ZPIC has then used this as a basis to argue that the claims did not qualify for Medicare coverage.   

In summary, health care providers should continually be reviewing their compliance efforts to ensure that basic mistakes such as the ones in this case (failure to properly screen employees) do not occur.

Robert W. Liles, Esq. owns a private law firm, Liles Parker, which focuses on fraud defense, internal audits, compliance, and regulatory matters. Robert serves as General Compliance Counsel for the American Medical Billing Association.

Read More

Number of False Claims Act Investigations Being Pursued is Currently at an All Time High . . . and is Likely to Go Even Higher Due to Changes to the False Claims Act Under Health Care Reform

Robert W. Liles, Esq., Liles Parker December 23rd, 2010

Leave a Comment Latest by COMMENTOR NAME

As set out in a U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) Press Release issued earlier this week, during Fiscal Year 2010 (ending September 30, 2010), DOJ secured $3 billion in civil settlements and judgments in connection with cases involving fraud against the government. Notably, $2.5 billion (approximately 83%) of the recoveries were related to health care fraud cases. According to DOJ, since January 2009, $5.4 billion has been collected under the False Claims Act and returned to Federal programs (such as the Medicare Trust Fund) and / or the Treasury. As Assistant Attorney General of the Civil Division Tony West reported:

“Under Attorney General Eric Holder’s leadership, our aggressive pursuit of fraud under the False Claims Act has resulted in the largest two-year recovery of taxpayer dollars in the history of the Justice Department. . . Nowhere is this more apparent than in our success in fighting health care fraud. Since January 2009, the Civil Division, together with the U.S. Attorneys’ offices, commenced more health care fraud investigations, secured larger fines and judgments, and recovered more taxpayer dollars lost to health care fraud than in any other two-year period.” (emphasis added).

While the number of False Claim Act cases commenced during the last two years is at an all time high, this number is likely to further grown due to recent changes to the False Claims Act under Health Care Reform.

Pursuant to Section 6402 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (generally referred to as the “Health Care Reform Act”), Medicare participating providers, including Physicians, Group Practices, Chiropractors, Home Health Agencies, Hospices, Community Mental Health Clinics, and others who identify an “overpayment” must report and return the overpayment, explaining (in writing) how the overpayment occurred within 60 days. As the statute provides:

‘The PPACA states that “[a]ny overpayment retained by a person after the deadline for reporting and returning the overpayment. . . is an obligation [as defined in the False Claims Act.”

Failure to meet this obligation may subject a provider to to monetary penalties of up to $11,000 per claim (in this case, in the form of an “overpayment,” plus treble damages.

As many providers can readily confirm, confirming that an overpayment exists isn’t always that easy, especially in complex cases where a patient has secondary insurance and / or the number of claims processed (as charges, credits and corrections) may be quite large. Additionally, due to the complexity of Medicare coverage and payment rules, two reasonable individuals may disagree as to whether an overpayment is present. In any event, the number of potential whistleblowers (individuals with knowledge of arguable overpayments under Section 6402), will undoubtedly increase.

Health care providers should review their current Compliance Plan to better ensure that internal audit and review mechanisms are in place so that any overpayments can be readily identified and repaid to the government within the 60-day deadline. The decision of where to disclose and return an overpayment, whether to a Medicare Administrative Contractor (MAC), the Department of Health and Human Services – Office of inspector General (HHS-OIG), or to DOJ, may differ depending on the facts. Depending on the size or complexity of an overpayment, a provider may need to contact legal counsel for advise on how to best handle the alleged overpayment. Due to the 60-day deadline, if legal counsel is to be involved, they must should be contacted as soon as possible.

An effective Compliance Plan case assist in the identification and proper handling of overpayments. If your practice has not already implemented an effective Compliance Plan, it should do so immediately.

Robert W. Liles, Esq. owns a private law firm, Liles Parker, which focuses on fraud defense, internal audits, compliance, and regulatory matters. Robert serves as General Compliance Counsel for the American Medical Billing Association.

Read More

‘Tis the Season – To Increase Your Revenue with Refocused Medical Billing

Thom Schildmeyer December 22nd, 2010

Leave a Comment Latest by COMMENTOR NAME

This holiday season, amidst our nation’s tumultuous economy, give yourself a gift—the gift of increased revenue without increased costs—as it relates to your medical billing.

Work Smarter, Not Harder
Unfortunately, medical practices are not immune to the sagging economic conditions impacting most other industries throughout the country. In recent months, many physicians have seen a significant drop in collections and, thus, a decrease in revenue.

Oftentimes, the “knee-jerk” reaction is to aggressively attract and treat more patients, thinking higher volume alone will result in more money. Yet, there are considerable expenses associated with this strategy that reduce profitability, from marketing and advertising to the actual cost of service.

In fact, many physicians who travel down this path find themselves working harder and longer hours, only to increase levels of stress with marginal benefit to their bottom line. Something different must be done.

Focus on Your Outstanding A/R
Fortunately, there’s a much easier way to increase your revenue without expending additional resources. And it’s right there in front of you: your outstanding accounts receivable (A/R).

For example, take a practice that on average posts $100,000 in clinical charges each month. It’s not uncommon for that practice to have an outstanding A/R balance of 1.5 times that amount, or roughly $150,000, carried over each month. An average contractual adjustment rate of 25 percent* results in approximately $112,500 for which the practice has earned and is legally owed, but has not yet collected. (*For example only, as this rate varies based on a number of factors.)

Can you afford to walk away from this money, leaving well-deserved revenue on the table? For most practices, the answer is no. But where do you start? The first step is to assess whether your billing staff has the capacity and expertise to focus on A/R collections. If so, simply redirecting them with a sense of urgency to improve performance can yield significant results.

Collect on Unpaid Claims—Faster
When assessing your outstanding A/R, look first at your unpaid insurance claims. Collecting on a higher number of claims sooner than later will result in immediate revenue for your practice. Below are a few best practices to help facilitate smoother claims submission and, most important, faster payment:

  • Identify patterns with insurance carriers—When working to resolve unpaid claims, it’s important to find a pattern relative to each insurance carrier. If you are able to discover a common factor, you can modify your billing style to avoid future denials.
  • Review claims before resubmitting—Make the most of the information you have before spending time to gather more, by addressing the following items:
    -  Ensure that proper contractual adjustments are made to each line item
    -  Verify that CPT and ICD-9 codes are for covered services
    -  Check modifiers; remember global periods, unrelated procedures on the same date of service, and separately identifiable evaluation/management services
    -  Review insurance authorization and physician referral requirements to determine if an authorization is (or needs to be) in place.
    -  Determine if the bill should be moved to a secondary insurance or the patient
  • Create a strategy for easy “wins”—If all information appears correct and claims still require follow-up, prioritize your unpaid claim list to pursue the “low-hanging fruit” first. Considering the age of the claim and outstanding dollar amount to prioritize your list is a common way to increase your collections success rate.

A less applied, but perhaps even more valuable technique, is to look closely at your payer mix, identifying those that are easiest to work with and have faster turnaround times. Are you required to complete an online form, mail a letter, or make a phone call? If “Carrier A” processes claims in 10 days and “Carrier B” processes in 28 days, where should you start?

Combining these principles with your existing A/R process can help resolve more claims in a shorter amount of time. Furthermore, receiving the outstanding funds quicker can make the average amount per claim less relevant to your overall strategy.

Don’t Miss These, Either
Beyond collecting on unpaid claims, there are several other opportunities for quickly enhancing your revenue stream. While they are seemingly basic concepts any office should apply, you’d be surprised at how many dermatology practices fail to capitalize on these areas, letting easy revenue slip away.

  • Collect co-payments at time of service—Billing patients for their co-payments can delay revenue 30-60 days, or longer if not paid on time. Take advantage of the patient visit to capture revenue immediately by collecting co-payments up front.
  • Collect past due balances at time of service—Similar to co-payments, take the opportunity to collect past due balances in person (at initial or follow-up appointment), versus billing them later. This requires communication between your scheduler, receptionist, and billing staff.
  • Charge for missed appointments—While practices have different opinions on this policy (to the point of controversy), some dermatologists charge a fee for missed appointments. If a patient does not provide notice of cancellation, you need to decide whether or not to charge for the loss of revenue you would have captured with another appointment.
  • Review and adjust your fee schedule—At a minimum, assess your fee schedule annually to ensure you are capturing the revenue you’re entitled to. Review your schedule against all insurance contracts and make sure you’re charging the maximum allowable amounts. Don’t leave money you’ve earned in the payers’ hands.
  • Transfer balances and send statements—Yes, as fundamental as it sounds, some practices delay (or overlook) transferring balances to patients. Simply doing so and sending out statements can generate faster payment and, thus, more revenue.
  • Check eligibility – Checking the eligibility for every patient that comes in your door before they are seen cuts down on denials substantially. Knowing if someone has changed insurance and not only taking a copy of the card but actually checking the eligibility before they are seen avoids wasted time processing a denial when it could have been mitigated before the patient ever set foot in the practice.
  • Prepay larger dollar procedures – Many patients are now faced with higher deductibles and more patient responsibilities. This is becoming a challenging part of the practice’s cash flow (patient collections). Therefore, running an eligibility check and understanding what the patient responsibility is before the procedure helps set the cash flow up for a more successful outcome. Actually having the patient prepay their copay and deductible before coming into the practice is common in many surgical specialties. There are many nuances with this process you should look at further before implementing, but this can be very helpful, especially in a more surgically based practice.

Consider Your Billing Alternatives
Assuming most, if not all, physicians are unwilling to walk away from their outstanding A/R or other areas of opportunity, they must determine how to pursue this incremental revenue. For those practices with efficiently managed, experienced billing staff and operations, it’s simply a matter of committing to A/R collections and getting started. Practices with limited or inexperienced billing resources, lack of systems and processes, and no desire to manage the challenges with in-house billing, may want to consider outsourcing their overall billing operations.

An outsource billing company can lend extensive experience and expertise to help you increase revenue, maximize profitability, and streamline your billing processes—enabling you to focus on patient care. If you do decide to outsource, carefully consider vendor qualifications and ability to meet your practice needs. At a minimum, your selected billing company should have:

  • Your specialty billing expertise
  • Experienced, professional billing staff
  • Quality service and proven business performance
  • Strong leadership and management
  • Satisfied customers and solid references
  • Company stability and long-term commitment

By leveraging either your internal resources to focus on collections, or turning to an outsource billing company to handle all of your billing needs, you’ll be well on your way to enjoying the gift of increased revenue—up to thousands of dollars—throughout the New Year and beyond.

Thom Schildmeyer, president of Aesyntix Billing Solutions, has 15 years’ experience working with physicians in the areas of finance, billing, operations, practice valuation, human resources, education and training, marketing, and overall practice development. For more information, contact tschildmeyer@aesyntix.com, or visit http://www.aesyntix.com/.

Read More

Web-Based Medical Billing Software: Is it Right for Your Office?

Kathy McCoy, MBA December 20th, 2010

Leave a Comment Latest by COMMENTOR NAME

Software as a service (SaaS), On Demand software, web-based software—these are all terms for the same thing: software that is provided over the Internet rather than residing on your office computers. The question is whether web-based medical billing software is the right choice for your office.

Once the exception, web-based software has become more common over the last 4-5 years and now is widely used for a variety of applications including webinars and meetings (WebEx, GoToMeeting), accounting (Quickbooks Online, NetSuite) and customer relationship management (SalesForce.com, Zoho.com), to mention a few.

In fact, the popularity of web-based software is growing so fast that International Data Corporation (IDC,) a leading provider of market intelligence for the information technology market, projected in a July 26, 2010 report that by 2012, nearly 85% of net-new software firms coming to market will be built around SaaS service composition and delivery.

Exactly what is web-based, or “On Demand” software? In the On Demand world, your business applications are delivered over the Internet by your software provider for a monthly subscription fee. There are no upfront costs; you simply pay-as-you-go for the features you use. By spreading costs over many customers, web-based software companies can better afford to invest in the infrastructure required to support higher levels of software reliability than a small business could achieve on its own. The software provider automates routine maintenance tasks such as backups, hardware upgrades, and security protection. Change is embraced and even built into the delivery of applications with regular and automatic software updates.

With On Demand technology, a medical practice or third-party medical billing company can free itself from the upfront expense of medical billing software licenses and hardware. It can get up and running more quickly and take advantage of first-class infrastructure at a fraction of the cost of managing the software in-house. Software from On Demand providers can be updated frequently in response to customer needs and the competition.

This all might sound a bit like a description of the application service providers (ASPs) in the late 1990s—companies in which investors lost so much money and whose customers were left dazed and confused. However, there is a clear difference: many of the so-called ASPs simply built out massive data centers and ran rental services for other people’s software. In contrast, today’s web-based software companies design their software from the ground up to be delivered over the Internet as a service.

Advantages of Web-Based Medical Billing Software

So web-based software is a fast-growing trend; but is it right for your business needs?

Web-based medical billing software offers several advantages that are driving the growth in acceptance of this solution:

Regular Updates—With most web-based software, you’ll receive regular updates of your software–often every 6-8 weeks–providing new features and improvements. You’ll get these updates without any additional charge and without needing IT staff in your office to upload it. One Kareo customer has said, “The quarterly updates are almost like Christmas… ‘What will Santa bring us this time?’”

Data Security—Web-based medical billing software provides regular back-ups and high level security, something most smaller medical practices can’t afford. You don’t have to worry about securing your data from disgruntled employees or whether your back up ran last night; with web-based software, all of that happens automatically without any direction or involvement from you. And most web-based software companies provide a level of security for their data centers that a medical practice or smaller medical billing service could never hope to achieve, with keycards, fireproofing and other high standards that prevent data loss.

Reduced IT Staffing Demands—As described above, one of the biggest benefits of web-based software is the reduced need for IT staff’s involvement, freeing that limited resource for other vital tasks. With simple installation (generally a sign-up that takes just a few minutes), updates that are handled by the software vendor and back-ups and security also handled by experts, your IT staffing demands are minimal.

Accessibility—Web-based medical billing software can be accessed from virtually any computer with an Internet connection, which means you can check on the status of your business from home, on vacation, or anywhere you happen to be. Plus, this accessibility means your providers can access their data easily from home or office, and your staff can work off site as well. After switching to web-based software, Keith Davison, owner of Aztec Medical Billing Service, said, “Now my billers work from home the hours they want to work as long as the work gets done. They can work in their pj’s or an evening gown or anything between. They love it! Plus, our overhead for the business is much less with no office to maintain.”

With the current incentives for EMRs, many practices are certain to turn to web-based software as a more affordable, easy to use solution. The rapid growth of Practice Fusion, the free, ad-supported EMR with which Kareo partners, is a prime example of how internet-based software can be used to provide a service which could not necessarily be afforded by smaller practices.

Evaluating Internet-Based Medical Billing Software for Your Office

In many ways, evaluating software requires the same considerations whether the software resides on your own servers/computers or on the Internet. The best place to begin is determining what your requirements are, ranking them by priority in terms of “must have,” “want to have,” and “not important.” Some of the key points to consider include:

Ease of Use—You want a system that won’t take months to implement and won’t frustrate your staff. Many software companies will allow you a free trial; this can be an important way to see how user-friendly the system truly is. Be sure to have the staff members who will actually be using the system test it and give honest feedback.

Off-Site Connectivity—Do you want to have access to your software and data from any location? If so, then web-based software may better meet your needs. Also, be sure that your office can support the bandwidth required by web-based software. With broader availability of high-speed Internet, this isn’t as much of an issue as it was a few years ago, but you need to insure that your Internet connection will support consistent use of a web-based software. A system that is too slow or frequently down will frustrate your staff and slow down your office processes.

Transparency—Busy physicians and office managers don’t need complicated systems that make it difficult for them to track the practice’s financial health.  Be sure the software you’re considering provides the reporting you need, or the capability to quickly generate custom reports that meet the practice’s needs.

Affordability—Be sure to consider the full cost of either type of system. Are there set-up costs and a long-term contract? Some web-based medical billing software (such as Kareo) does not require up-front fees or contracts, and this provides you with a greater amount of flexibility than those companies that require contracts and fees.

Security—How will you insure your data is secure and backed up on a regular basis? With web-based software, your data is secure off-site and automatically backed up daily, without you or your staff needing to do a thing. If you purchase software that is not web-based, you will need to arrange for regular backups and HIPAA-compliant security.

Training and Support—Be sure that the system you select provides the training and support your staff will need in order to be productive quickly. Most web-based software companies provide online videos and resources, as well as live training and support via both email and phone.

The key to choosing the right medical billing software is to clearly identify your needs and evaluate the various packages on how well they meet your key and peripheral needs. Don’t be distracted by bells and whistles that you don’t need; look for those features that will make or break your business, and then choose the software that best delivers those features. Increasingly, you may find that software will be web-based.

Read More

The Ten Biggest Mistakes Billing Offices Make – And How to Avoid Them

Elizabeth W. Woodcock, MBA, FACMPE, CPC December 20th, 2010

1 Comment Latest by COMMENTOR NAME

10 Mistakes of Billing Offices2011 brings significant challenges for professional fee billing. With medical reimbursements stagnant or declining in the face of rising practice costs, there is little room for error. Medical practices need top-performing billing offices now more than ever. Unfortunately, many billing operations seem to spin their wheels, making the same mistakes over and over. To guide your practice to success, take steps today to avoid these ten mistakes that billing offices all too commonly make:

  1. Always blaming poor performance on insurance payers. It’s easy to denounce one – or perhaps all – of your insurance payers for higher denial rates, plunging reimbursement or an increase in write-offs. The relationship between payers and providers is at times so caustic that they make easy targets. Successful billing offices don’t look for scapegoats. They recognize that there are indeed problems stemming from payers – slow payment, inconsistent application of reimbursement rules and inappropriate denials, just to name a few. But successful billing operations also know that addressing internal performance improvement, while simultaneously targeting those external challenges, is a priority.
  2. Not measuring key performance indicators consistently. Every manager thinks that their operation is top-notch. And, with such a “perfect” operation, they may see no reason to closely monitor performance. Successful billing offices realize that keeping track of performance indicators is critical. Create a dashboard of key performance indicators that includes days in receivables outstanding, aged trial balance, adjusted collection rate, cash and other important indicators for your practice. Agree on how to define the indicators and commit to measuring them monthly. Success depends not only on how well they are monitored, but also on sharing the information with all stakeholders as a means to root out inefficiency, stop costly mistakes and improve performance.
  3. Hiring the wrong people. With so many advertisements for billing courses, it seems that everyone is a “trained” biller these days. Combine the proliferation of training courses – some good, but some very bad – with the propensity of job candidates to stretch the truth on their resumes and it’s easy to see how hiring the wrong employee is more than sporadic, it’s epidemic. Successful billing offices know that finding the right staff member is not only important, it’s essential. A resume review and a 30-minute interview are simply not enough; checking references, verifying credentials and conducting pre-employment testing are vital steps before making the decision to hire.
  4. Failing to recognize the importance of internal controls. By some estimates, as many as two out of three physicians will be victims of embezzlement during their careers. Considering the volume of transactions (and money) each staff member handles and the lack of internal controls, the environment is ripe for stealing in most medical practices. Successful billing offices don’t wait until a problem occurs. They avoid embezzlement problems by establishing a comprehensive framework of internal financial controls, adhering to those controls and making careful hiring decisions. Preventing fraud and embezzlement depend on separation of duties, tight controls over payment processing and rigorous accounting oversight.
  5. Thinking they control the entire billing process. In today’s environment, a practice cannot achieve financial success by attempting to house every aspect of the billing process within the four walls of a billing office. Successful managers understand that revenue cycle activities extend to every corner of the practice. Achievement starts with negotiating contracts that establish the practice as an equal partner with its insurance payers. The provider enrollment process is completed in a timely and accurate manner. The front office, clinical staff and billing office work together to complete their respective tasks in pre-service financial clearance, time-of-service collections and effective charge capture at the practice site. Failing to consider all functions associated with the revenue cycle – and where they occur – results in poor performance. When these functions are fully defined and closely monitored, the billing office can indeed be successful.
  6. Buying a great practice management system, but never fully utilizing it. It’s easy to blame the practice management system for problems – the system can’t post a charge, print a report or take an adjustment. Although every system has its challenges, the untrained user is the biggest limitation of all. Stop longing for the system on which you were originally trained and stop comparing every other system to it. Successful billing offices know that the old system had more failures and shortcomings than one may choose to recall. And the old, simple-to-use management software could hardly keep up with today’s demands. Performance depends on tapping into the vendor’s knowledge and developing one’s own skills in using the system. Successful billing offices also reach out to other users to learn from their experiences.
  7. Failing to take advantage of automation. With the current focus on electronic health records, it’s easy to overlook the many new applications of technology in the billing office. Successful billing offices recognize that, as the volume of transactions increases while reimbursement for each declines, automation is critical to maintaining profitability. The onus is on today’s billing offices to do more work with fewer people. To do so, you must take advantage of medical billing software that automates charge capture and entry, scrubs codes, manages staff tasks, remits electronically, uses predictive dialers and many more applications.
  8. Taking write offs. Insurance payers routinely deny payment for services – often the denials are for line items, but sometimes for an entire claim. Lazy billers do not hesitate to write off these accounts. By adjusting the money off to a code tied to the payer, they treat these adjustments as contractual adjustments and, thus, effectively, though unintentionally, hide the real reason for the non-payment. Successful billing offices recognize that their job is much more than just keying and posting. Working denials, even at the line item level, is essential. When services must be adjusted, successful billing offices use special codes to monitor these write-offs – and they look for opportunities to avoid those problems in the future.
  9. Batching work. Let’s face it – even with the best technology, there is plenty of paper floating around a business office. Paper breeds professional organizers – people who can’t seem to get away from paper so they produce it, even when they don’t have to. Professional organizers often spend more time organizing the work – printing and sorting reports, using highlighters to mark accounts and filing paper in folders – than actually doing it. Successful billing offices recognize that organization is key, but they use automation to assist in workflow. They hold staff accountable for performing work, not simply batching it.
  10. Failing to prioritize. There’s always more work in the billing office than can be done, so prioritization is critical. If you can’t balance all of the responsibilities – keying charges, posting payments, appealing denials and so forth – you won’t be successful. Successful billing offices recognize that the prioritization of functions is critical, day in and day out.

It’s human to make mistakes, but knowing that you made them is essential to avoiding repeating them. There’s always room for improvement. So, with the new year upon us, now’s the time to figure out ways to learn from your mistakes. Commit to making your operation a success by avoiding the ten biggest mistakes that billing offices always seem to make.

Elizabeth Woodcock, MBA, FACMPE, CPC, is an expert, author, speaker and trainer in practice management operations and revenue cycle management whose clients include Kareo medical billing software. She is a co-author of “The Physician Billing Process: Avoiding Potholes in the Road to Getting Paid.”

Read More

View Our Free Webinar – Key Performance Indicators in Medical Billing: How to Make 2011 More Profitable for Your Practice than 2010

admin December 17th, 2010

Leave a Comment Latest by COMMENTOR NAME

Key Performance Indicator in Medical BillingLearn how to make 2011 more profitable for your practice with Elizabeth Woodcock, co-author of The Physician Billing Process: Avoiding Potholes in the Road to Getting Paid and expert speaker and trainer in practice management.

It’s not good enough to hope for the best at the end of the year. To maximize your revenue, you need to calculate, benchmark, and analyze key revenue cycle performance indicators. You will learn what to measure, how to measure it, get benchmark data for all aspects of the revenue cycle, and understand what’s influencing performance in 2011.  In addition to performance indicators, such as days in A/R, the program highlights denial rates and billing office costs. From performance to cost, learn all you need to know about your revenue cycle.

View Now to Gain Insights on How to:

•     Benchmark all aspects of your revenue cycle, including performance and cost.
•     Learn why and how to perform an account audit.
•     Discover common mistakes to avoid in revenue cycle management.
•     And much more

Should Attend
Private practice owners, office managers, billing managers, billers, billing service owners and others concerned about improving the profitability of medical practices and managing revenue cycles for healthcare practices will benefit from this informative session.

About Your Speaker:
Elizabeth Woodcock, MBA, FACMPE, CPC
Elizabeth Woodcock is a speaker, trainer and author who is passionately dedicated to helping physician practices achieve and sustain patient satisfaction, practice efficiency, and profitability. An expert at practice operations and revenue cycle management, she is nationally recognized for her outstanding presentations and writing

View Now

Read More

The Ten Biggest Mistakes Billing Offices Make – And How to Avoid Them

Elizabeth W. Woodcock, MBA, FACMPE, CPC December 15th, 2010

2 Comments Latest by COMMENTOR NAME

2011 brings significant challenges for professional fee billing. With medical reimbursements stagnant or declining in the face of rising practice costs, there is little room for error. Medical practices need top-performing billing offices now more than ever. Unfortunately, many billing operations seem to spin their wheels, making the same mistakes over and over. To guide your practice to success, take steps today to avoid these ten mistakes that billing offices all too commonly make:

  1. Always blaming poor performance on insurance payers. It’s easy to denounce one – or perhaps all – of your insurance payers for higher denial rates, plunging reimbursement or an increase in write-offs. The relationship between payers and providers is at times so caustic that they make easy targets. Successful billing offices don’t look for scapegoats. They recognize that there are indeed problems stemming from payers – slow payment, inconsistent application of reimbursement rules and inappropriate denials, just to name a few. But successful billing operations also know that addressing internal performance improvement, while simultaneously targeting those external challenges, is a priority.
  2. Not measuring key performance indicators consistently. Every manager thinks that their operation is top-notch. And, with such a “perfect” operation, they may see no reason to closely monitor performance. Successful billing offices realize that keeping track of performance indicators is critical. Create a dashboard of key performance indicators that includes days in receivables outstanding, aged trial balance, adjusted collection rate, cash and other important indicators for your practice. Agree on how to define the indicators and commit to measuring them monthly. Success depends not only on how well they are monitored, but also on sharing the information with all stakeholders as a means to root out inefficiency, stop costly mistakes and improve performance.
  3. Hiring the wrong people. With so many advertisements for billing courses, it seems that everyone is a “trained” biller these days. Combine the proliferation of training courses – some good, but some very bad – with the propensity of job candidates to stretch the truth on their resumes and it’s easy to see how hiring the wrong employee is more than sporadic, it’s epidemic. Successful billing offices know that finding the right staff member is not only important, it’s essential. A resume review and a 30-minute interview are simply not enough; checking references, verifying credentials and conducting pre-employment testing are vital steps before making the decision to hire.
  4. Failing to recognize the importance of internal controls. By some estimates, as many as two out of three physicians will be victims of embezzlement during their careers. Considering the volume of transactions (and money) each staff member handles and the lack of internal controls, the environment is ripe for stealing in most medical practices. Successful billing offices don’t wait until a problem occurs. They avoid embezzlement problems by establishing a comprehensive framework of internal financial controls, adhering to those controls and making careful hiring decisions. Preventing fraud and embezzlement depend on separation of duties, tight controls over payment processing and rigorous accounting oversight.
  5. Thinking they control the entire billing process. In today’s environment, a practice cannot achieve financial success by attempting to house every aspect of the billing process within the four walls of a billing office. Successful managers understand that revenue cycle activities extend to every corner of the practice. Achievement starts with negotiating contracts that establish the practice as an equal partner with its insurance payers. The provider enrollment process is completed in a timely and accurate manner. The front office, clinical staff and billing office work together to complete their respective tasks in pre-service financial clearance, time-of-service collections and effective charge capture at the practice site. Failing to consider all functions associated with the revenue cycle – and where they occur – results in poor performance. When these functions are fully defined and closely monitored, the billing office can indeed be successful.
  6. Buying a great practice management system, but never fully utilizing it. It’s easy to blame the practice management system for problems – the system can’t post a charge, print a report or take an adjustment. Although every system has its challenges, the untrained user is the biggest limitation of all. Stop longing for the system on which you were originally trained and stop comparing every other system to it. Successful billing offices know that the old system had more failures and shortcomings than one may choose to recall. And the old, simple-to-use management software could hardly keep up with today’s demands. Performance depends on tapping into the vendor’s knowledge and developing one’s own skills in using the system. Successful billing offices also reach out to other users to learn from their experiences.
  7. Failing to take advantage of automation. With the current focus on electronic health records, it’s easy to overlook the many new applications of technology in the billing office. Successful billing offices recognize that, as the volume of transactions increases while reimbursement for each declines, automation is critical to maintaining profitability. The onus is on today’s billing offices to do more work with fewer people. To do so, you must take advantage of medical billing software that automates charge capture and entry, scrubs codes, manages staff tasks, remits electronically, uses predictive dialers and many more applications.
  8. Taking write offs. Insurance payers routinely deny payment for services – often the denials are for line items, but sometimes for an entire claim. Lazy billers do not hesitate to write off these accounts. By adjusting the money off to a code tied to the payer, they treat these adjustments as contractual adjustments and, thus, effectively, though unintentionally, hide the real reason for the non-payment. Successful billing offices recognize that their job is much more than just keying and posting. Working denials, even at the line item level, is essential. When services must be adjusted, successful billing offices use special codes to monitor these write-offs – and they look for opportunities to avoid those problems in the future.
  9. Batching work. Let’s face it – even with the best technology, there is plenty of paper floating around a business office. Paper breeds professional organizers – people who can’t seem to get away from paper so they produce it, even when they don’t have to. Professional organizers often spend more time organizing the work – printing and sorting reports, using highlighters to mark accounts and filing paper in folders – than actually doing it. Successful billing offices recognize that organization is key, but they use automation to assist in workflow. They hold staff accountable for performing work, not simply batching it.
  10. Failing to prioritize. There’s always more work in the billing office than can be done, so prioritization is critical. If you can’t balance all of the responsibilities – keying charges, posting payments, appealing denials and so forth – you won’t be successful. Successful billing offices recognize that the prioritization of functions is critical, day in and day out.

It’s human to make mistakes, but knowing that you made them is essential to avoiding repeating them. There’s always room for improvement. So, with the new year upon us, now’s the time to figure out ways to learn from your mistakes. Commit to making your operation a success by avoiding the ten biggest mistakes that billing offices always seem to make.

Elizabeth Woodcock, MBA, FACMPE, CPC, is an expert, author, speaker and trainer in practice management operations and revenue cycle management whose clients include Kareo medical billing software. She is a co-author of “The Physician Billing Process: Avoiding Potholes in the Road to Getting Paid.”

Read More

Medical Billing: How to Get Paid Better – Part II

Judy Capko December 15th, 2010

Leave a Comment Latest by COMMENTOR NAME

How well the medical billing and collection pieces work in your practice is a reflection on your practice’s use of its resources. Getting this right the first time reduces the amount of effort it takes to get you paid timely and properly.

 Where does the revenue chain begin? Some people think it begins when the patient’s charges are entered into the computer system, but in reality the revenue chain starts when the patient first calls your office and ends when the account is paid in full. Let’s take a look at the primary steps and resources needed to get paid better.

The Medical Scheduler

This is the point of entry and it is important to clearly define the responsibility the scheduler has in getting you paid. Since their first duties are to give patients good customer service, answer the patient’s questions and understand the appointment needs, the financial responsibilities can quickly become diluted and appear less important.   

The scheduler’s first cue on relating the appointment scheduling process to finances is the pre-registration for new patients and updating demographics and insurance information for established patients. Teach schedulers the right way to do it:

  1. Collect appropriate and accurate insurance data rather than breeze through it;
  2. Make sure the patient understands if the practice is contracted with the payer or whether the patient will be seen “out of network”, which means he or she will be paying a larger portion of the bill; and 
  3. Document any payment discussions and commitments made by the patient when he called for an appointment.

It is important to call upon your billing department to train schedulers on the nuances of insurances – what information is needed from the patient and what to communicate to the patient that will clarify their financial responsibility – and to do this in a way that keeps the patient and the staff working together.

The Medical Office Receptionist(s)

This comes down to check-in and check-out responsibilities. At check-in, the receptionist needs to go beyond collecting patient registration information – such information needs to be reviewed for legibility and thoroughness. Failure to verify information and accurately enter it into the system can result in costly errors and delayed or non-payment. 

Receptionists need to align their thinking to look beyond the cost of today’s visit and understand how much money the patient already owes the practice. Management has an important role in clearly identifying what the receptionist’s collection responsibilities are and to help them set goals for collections at time of service.

This must be supported by training receptionists to examine patient balances and address this when the patient is in the office. To achieve this, the receptionist must learn how to audit a patient’s account and help patients understand how this balance was accrued. Receptionists also need a clear understanding of the practice’s payment policies and what steps should be taken to ensure the patient complies with these policies. This can be accomplished by:

  • Establishing payment expectations in the financial policies;
  • Providing staff with the skills on how to effectively ask and obtain payment from patients; and
  • Identifying methods to reinforce policies.

Clinical Staff

Physicians, mid-level providers and clinical support staff are critical to providing essential documentation for the care that provided with each visit. Whether this is accomplished with an electronic or paper chart, timeliness is vital to improving accuracy and minimizing the possibility of dropping a service and failure to charge and code (ICD-9) the diagnostic reasons for the visit and the procedure code selection (CPT). Documentation of the contents of the visit is what supports the level of service for evaluation and management CPT code and the need for diagnostic testing and procedures performed.    

The goal is to have documentation for services rendered complete and entered into the practice management system at the end of the day.

Medical Billing and Collection Staff

Each practice needs a coder in residence. This requires someone who has superior knowledge in coding rules and application. The practice needs to make an investment in providing the resident coder with the training to become a certified coder. The AAPC coding certification is acquired through gaining expertise and passing the test provided by the American Academy of Professional Coders, www.aapc.com. Certified coders are required to obtain continuing education credits to maintain their certification. Once this is accomplished your coder will qualify as the “go to” person when there are questions about coding. 

Important responsibilities that can be included in the job description for this position are:

  1. Monitors coding and billing performance including variances between providers;
  2. Obtains continuing education on coding each year [at the practice’s expense] with close attention to changes affecting the practice’s specialty; 
  3. Trains appropriate staff  on coding matters, including changes that affect the practice and its specialty each year; and
  4. Provides formal coding training sessions for new clinicians and new billing staff members within 30 days of hire.

With physicians typically charging a minimum of $400,000 a year [and double that for some specialties], it’s worth protecting your revenue and investing in a resident coder to keep the practice on track with billing properly for the services that are rendered. There’s a big upside to having a sharp coder that helps the entire office understand coding requirements so that you get paid better for what you do.

Once billing is accurately submitted, the arduous job of following up on claims begins.   Following up on claims is where staff expertise pays off big time!

Auditing claims payment and sending appeals is vital to protect the practice’s revenue. Don’t assume the insurance plans are adjudicating claims appropriately. They make errors that result in lower reimbursement for the practice. 

It’s difficult to imagine, but in the United States a whopping 30% of insurance claims submitted are denied, according to Healthcare Business Advisors, LLC, Albany NY 2007 report – and of that 15% are never resubmitted. Guess who gets the short end of that stick? You are right – It’s the practice.

CMS (Center for Medicare Services) reports that Medicare denies 11% of submitted claims and 40% of those are never resubmitted. That’s a huge number. To make it even more interesting, Medicare data reveals 65% of the claims reviewed on appeal result in increased payments. Experts say 50-80% of appealed claims are eventually paid – so fight for your money! 

Top-Notch Staff

The message is clear: Hire the best, let them know what you expect and treat them right. This presents new challenges, as some medical office staff members abandon the practice environment and seek opportunities outside of medicine. To identify ways to appeal to the best candidates, answer a few important questions:

  1. How attractive is our practice opportunity for a prospective employee;
  2. What significant changes can be made to appeal to the best candidates; and
  3. Does our culture truly value staff?

A culture of respect places a high value on staff – respecting them as individuals and for their talents – and it starts top-down. Practice leaders must demonstrate how they value employees in their words and actions. Don’t compromise staff’s value by cancelling staff meetings, allowing physicians’ failure to participate in staff meetings, or by failing to respond to their job needs or delaying purchasing needed equipment so they have tools to do the job better and grow their skills.

Communication is essential to building strong relationships with staff. Make sure staff members understand what you expect from them and provide the guidance to help them meet that expectation. When staff members feel appreciated and know they have management’s support, they will band together to reach higher levels of success.

Staying Ahead of the Curve

Healthcare reform brings many new issues to the forefront; some are obvious, others are fluid and will change over time. Guidelines and regulations will continually change. Those regulations will impact the way physicians conduct their business, the revenue they generate and the overall profits that are attainable.

One thing is evident; physicians are being pushed into the information age and the need to embrace electronic health records to manage internal data and provide clinical data to regulatory agents that will be used for industry experts to define standards of care and quality of services. 

It is the responsibility of physicians (and the administrative staff they depend on) to be well-informed and make prudent decisions in the interest of providing a high level of service and use wise economic practices. Keeping everyone in the office informed about their sphere of influence in both the service and financial component of the practice is just plain smart. Good communication and a clear sense of what it takes to succeed keeps everyone working as a team with a vested interest in achieving practice goals and rising above the nuances of practicing medicine in times of reform.

Your continual challenge will be to improve revenue and manage costs without compromising patient care or services. Methods to achieve this vary, including:

  • Advancing the quality of internal systems and services;
  • Establishing and monitoring clear standards of care;
  • Identifying when it is time to outsource and tap into another level of expertise; 
  • Streamlining processes and eliminate those without value; and
  • Obtaining optimal performance by achieving high morale and impressive productivity.

In the end, the most important factor is creating a culture of value and respect across the continuum of care and across the organization – a culture where everyone wins!

Judy Capko is the founder of Capko & Company and author of the popular book “Secrets of the Best-Run Practices,” Greenbranch Publishing, September 2005. Judy has specialized in medical practice operations and marketing for more than 20 years, and is a certified risk management specialist. www.Capko.com

Read More

Give Your Medical Billing Claims a Chance: Ensure Patient Eligibility

Thom Schildmeyer December 15th, 2010

Leave a Comment Latest by COMMENTOR NAME

Did you know that many claims are denied before the patient ever steps foot in the office? Don’t let that happen to you.

This article examines one of the highest denial reasons—patient eligibility—and why this is becoming more common in medical practices around the country. Also, most practices don’t recognize the damage these denials cause and, worse, that they are easily preventable. But prevention must start before the patient ever visits the office and receives services.

The Cause

The economy continues to sputter, and many believe we are still deep in a recession. Nationally, unemployment was at 9.6 percent in September 2010, and it’s even higher in many areas around the country. As more employees lose their jobs, many also lose their health benefits. Without income, they cannot afford the COBRA premium payments, so their insurance often terminates. The bottom line is that high unemployment means less jobs, less health insurance benefits and increased claim denials due to non-eligibility.

Companies also are feeling the pinch. Not only are they reducing their workforce, they are also looking for ways to reduce their expenses, and employee benefits represent one of their larger costs. Oftentimes, while employees keep their jobs, their health benefits are being cut. Therefore, “consumer-directed” insurance plans continue to grow and add further responsibility to the patient through higher co-payments, higher deductibles and reduced covered procedures by payers. This results in higher patient responsibility, which leads to reduced collections if the practice is not mindful of this occurrence.

All of this adds up to less insurance reimbursement and higher patient responsibilities, due to the following problem that exists today:

  1. Patient’s insurance is changing (carrier changes)
  2. Patient’s responsibility has changed (higher copayments, higher deductibles)
  3. Carriers are reducing covered procedures (higher patient responsibility)
  4. Patients have less disposable income to take on the higher responsibility
  5. Patient’s illnesses and need to see a physician/provider have not gone away

These factors lead to increased denials, increased delinquent patient payments and reduced collections, which results in reduced income for the providers.

Many of these issues around denials for eligibility and delinquent patient payments can be remedied with pre-visit activity, date of service activity and education/communication.

 Pre-visit activity

There are things the practice can do to reduce the eligibility denials, as well as the time and resources pursuing patient balances. Activities such as verifying insurance, completing eligibility verification and collecting a pre-payment on higher dollar procedures can help reduce the impact of these economic variables that are negatively impacting practices across the country.

Verifying Insurance:

It is more important than ever to check every patient’s insurance each time they walk into the office. I have advised practices for years on this basic activity, and I am still surprised by how often this is not done or not completed in the appropriate fashion.  In spite of all the economic variables–the increased patient balances on the accounts receivable (A/R), the slow pay from these patients, the significant extra effort around pursuing eligibility related denials–the first thing I hear from the staff is, “Do we have to do it for every patient?” or “What about the patients we saw last month?”  The most shocking is, “We already have their insurance card on file, so I don’t want to bother them or I don’t have time to look at their card.” These are actual quotes I have heard over and over.

The answer is, YES! A patient’s insurance can change daily and the patients either don’t want to tell you (could be embarrassment from a lost job or bankruptcy, where they can’t pay bills), they didn’t realize the change in insurance took them out of network (and now seeing you is not paid for) or didn’t realize their deductible has now changed (for example, from $1,000 a year to $6,000 a year, so that procedure is now their responsibility). The staff has to be educated on what has changed in the market and why the patients will not be forthcoming to tell you they have different responsibilities than the last time they visited.

If the staff makes it a habit to ask every person every time for their insurance card each time they visit, part of the battle is won before the patient is ever seen. Your staff also should look closely at what they are copying. It is staggering to see the number of claims that are denied because of non-eligibility when the patient provided a card that clearly is not valid, and the staff member didn’t even look at the card to see something has changed (name, address, effective date, different insurance card, etc.). They simply copy it and move on. For example, if they would have identified that a patient had Blue Cross last time and now is showing an Aetna card, then maybe something should be updated in the system. If so, then the claim will go out to the right carrier. If not, the claim will go out to the wrong carrier, a denial will come back for inactive eligibility and, after a little research, staff will find the insurance information was not updated. This scenario just cost the practice extra time (the claim has to be reprocessed), resources (staff has to touch this claim again when it could have been done right the first time) and money (provider cash flow is affected).

 It is imperative that every patient show their insurance card. Get a copy of it if possible because your staff may not be looking close enough, and it’s time-consuming to call a patient back for updated information. The staff should also look at every one closely and compare that to what is in the system.

Eligibility checks:

Most software systems today have some level of eligibility verification that it can perform. Kareo, the software Aesyntix Billing Solutions utilizes for its revenue cycle management (billing) customers across the country, has a built-in eligibility checker. Once the insurance information is in the system, we can check eligibility within seven seconds.  A screen pops up identifying whether or not the patient is eligible with that carrier, what their co-payment amount is and, often times, what their deductible is. Not all carriers are covered by this; however, most major ones do participate. If this is done a few days in advance of the patient visit, then the practice can reach out to the patient and ask for updated insurance information for verification. Why see the patient if you know their insurance is not updated or if you know a certain procedure is not covered? Also, if they have a high deductible, they may not be aware of their responsibility. This gives you an opportunity to communicate with them what their responsibility will be.

This is important, as many patients simply do not realize a lower premium (so they can save money) typically results in a higher deductible. The word “deductible” is foreign to most patients, but it does result in a higher patient responsibility that they may not be aware of. Thus, they will get a bill for what they are responsible for. Please keep in mind that most practices bill as a courtesy. The patient is still responsible for the services they seek if their insurance carrier deems the patient ineligible, service not covered, out of network or some other reason.

This is problematic as many patients get upset and state to the practice, “I have never paid $____ (fill in an amount) for an office visit,” or “The doctor only saw me for five minutes and you want to charge me $____.” This is new to them; their insurance company previously paid for the procedure because their insurance at the time had less patient responsibility. Ultimately, there is a change in culture here, and patients are the last to catch on because they have not had the financial burden in the past.

Therefore, complete an eligibility check beforehand, or you will find you will waste many hours pursuing denied claims (non-eligibility) and then addressing an upset patient. This wastes time and resources when it all could have been prevented before the patient ever walked into the practice. And not only does this slow down your cash flow and eat up your staff time, but the probability of collecting those dollars goes down as soon as the patient walks out the door.

As a matter of fact, Aesyntix Billing Solutions now provides patient eligibility and pre-payment services for many of our revenue cycle management customers for higher dollar procedures. Because of the high deductibles and changes in insurance, our service increases the probability of payment and reduces resources needed to pursue denied claims and/or patient responsibilities by having the patient pay their portion before the procedure or at the time of service. The exact amount of patient responsibility is not always known, so we determine an amount due based on a first-stage surgical procedure and notify the patient we will charge them for what their responsibility of the services rendered is. This becomes a win-win. The patient understands their responsibility before the procedure, and the practice collects the money earlier in the process. But the true victory is that everyone understands their role and the probability of collecting is 100 percent. If patients don’t pay, they don’t receive the service.

Summary

The economy has thrown a twist into the provider/patient relationship. As the economy continues to struggle, insurance carriers are increasing their premiums, decreasing coverage and passing some of the responsibility to patients. This is a change in the way insurance claims were handled a few years ago. Practices have to understand this change in business and appreciate the fact that their patient responsibility (accounts receivable) is growing and will continue to grow. Their staff resources are getting eaten up pursuing denials that are preventable. Identifying this change and having your staff incorporate these activities will decrease the frustrations, decrease the time spent on preventable denials and increase overall cash flow.

Thom Schildmeyer, MBA, is President of Aesyntix Health, Inc., a medical billing service based in Roseville, CA.

Read More

Medical Billing Tip of the Month — December

admin December 15th, 2010

Leave a Comment Latest by COMMENTOR NAME

We’re pleased to announce this month’s winner of the Medical Billing Tip of the Month contest and the recipient of a $250 gift card:

Use Kareo’s Alert Button to Notify Staff About the Need for Additional Modifiers

The best billing tip (which in my case does involve Kareo) is the use of the alert button when entering the patient information.  I used it to inform the person posting the charges that an additional modifier was necessary for that particular visit.  This prevents the claim from being denied on the initial submission. I set it to display when entering encounters and posting payments. So when she was posting the charges, big bold letters highlighted in yellow told her to use the kx modifier. This saved us time and money.

Carla Rodriguez
Hope Rehab
Houston, TX

Thank you to all who entered; please be sure to submit your Medical Billing Tip of the Month to Marketing@Kareo.com by Friday, January 7 for inclusion in the next round of judging. Good luck!

Read More

Welcome to Getting Paid, a weblog by Kareo offering ideas, news and opinions about medical billing and practice management with the goal of making medical billing easier and yes, getting you paid. Visit the Product Blog for more information on our products.

Subscribe to the Newsletter

Enter your email address to receive "Getting Paid" as a monthly email newsletter. Privacy Policy

Subscribe to RSS Feed

CDW 2015 TOP 50 Health IT Blog

Follow Kareo

Find Kareo on LinkedIn Find Kareo on Facebook Find Kareo on Twitter Find Kareo on YouTube Find Kareo on Flickr

Search the Blog

Categories

Monthly Archives

Web–Based Software by Kareo

Practice Management

Simplify the daily essential tasks of your medical office from patient records, to scheduling and more.

Electronic Medical Records

Improve patient care with electronic charting, electronic prescribing and medical labs interfaces.

Medical Billing & Collections

Streamline your entire medical billing and collections process from charge entry to reporting.

Clearinghouse Services

Integrated electronic claims, electronic remittance advice and insurance eligibility services.

Analytics & Data

Store and access data with insightful reports, document management and faxing, and an integration